Baltimore: thousands of suspects arrive too injured to go to jail, records show

Source: The Guardian

Thousands of people have been brought to the Baltimore city jail in recent years with injuries too severe for them to be admitted, newly released records have shown.

The records, obtained by the Baltimore Sun through a Maryland Public Information Act request, showed that correctional officers at the Baltimore City Detention Center refused to admit nearly 2,600 detainees who were in police custody between June 2012 and April 2015.

The records did not indicate how the people were injured or whether they suffered their injuries while in custody. However, they suggested police officers either ignored or did not notice the injuries. Suspects are constitutionally guaranteed health care before they are booked into jail.

Baltimore police are under scrutiny for their treatment of detainees following the death of Freddie Gray in April. Gray died of a broken neck that prosecutors said he suffered while riding in a Baltimore police van, and six officers involved in Gray’s arrest are facing criminal charges, including one charged with second-degree murder. Gray’s death sparked rioting and widespread protests in the city and came amid national scrutiny of how police officers treat suspects, particularly black men.

On Friday, the US Justice Department announced that it was conducting a civil-rights investigation of Baltimore police.

The records obtained by the Sun showed that 123 of the detainees who weren’t admitted to jail had visible head injuries, the third-most common ailment cited by jail officials. Others had broken bones, facial trauma and high blood pressure.

Police did not comment to the Sun, and department spokespeople did not immediately return messages left by Associated Press on Sunday.

After years of research and a series of unpleasant experiences concerning the current child protection services system, Alec Cope decided to combat the cancerous corruption through information. Freelance writing articles as a form of protest and distributing them throughout his former high-school and local area, Alec struck special chords with whomever he was in contact with.

Alec has been involved in activism such as sit down protests as well as Idle No More gatherings. Being independent for the majority of his time, Alec became a member of the WeAreChange family to assist one of the organizations that inspired him to become active in the first place. With a larger platform and positive support Alec has committed the majority of his time to research, writing, and maintaining social media with the goal to continue expanding the awakening sweeping throughout all levels of society.

Growing up within a rural area in Northern Michigan as well as being a native American descendant, Alec is seeking to expose environmental abuse in his state as well as globally. A high-school dropout, Alec chases his passion for writing and empowering individuals while showing any isolated person that they too can overcome the odds with a community that will support them. Alec lives in the lower peninsula of Michigan near Kalamazoo.

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