Opinion: How Canada, Ireland, Mexico Are Signaling the End of the Drug War


Source: FEE.org

“On November 4, Canada’s newly elected Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was sworn into office. Trudeau and the Liberal Party promise to legalize marijuana in Canada, which would make it only the second country to formally legalize the sale and consumption of cannabis. (Uruguay became the first, in 2013 — contrary to popular belief, pot is not technically legal in the Netherlands, but it is tolerated).

On November 3, the Irish government announced decriminalization of not just marijuana but also heroin and cocaine. The chief of Ireland’s National Drugs Strategy told the papers there was a “strong consensus that drugs across the board should be decriminalised.”

… users and addicts would no longer be locked up for their personal consumption. The results from Portugal’s decriminalization of all drugs in 2001 have been extremely extraordinary: deaths, addiction, and HIV infections from drugs have all dropped precipitously.

On November 5, the criminal chamber of the Mexican Supreme Court ruled that the country’s ban on marijuana was unconstitutional and found that individuals have a right to grow, possess, and use marijuana.”

Continue reading

War On ‘Drugs’, Really War On The People

As a result of (stricter cannabis laws) lots of coffee shops lost all of their customers, and those people (became) street-dealers.”


The History of Decriminalizing Marijuana in Holland

WeAreChange visits the Cannabis College in Amsterdam, Holland to learn more about the legislation of cannabis in the Netherlands. Contrary to what many people think, cannabis, among with most other drugs, is not actually legal in Holland. This video goes into the history of how this came about and what it means for cannabis users. (more…)

U.S. Legalization of Marijuana Has Hit Mexican Cartels’ Cross-Border Trade

Source: Time

In the midst of this seething mountain capital, Mexico’s security ministry houses a bizarre museum — a collection of what the army seizes from drug traffickers. The Museo de Enervantes, often referred to as the Narco Museum, has drug samples themselves (including the rare black cocaine), diamond-studded guns, gold-coated cell phones, rocket-propelled grenades and medals that cartels award their most productive smugglers. It also shows off the narcos’ ingenuity for getting their drugs into the United States, including “trap cars” with secret compartments, catapults to hurl packages over the border fence and even false buttocks, to hide drugs in. (more…)

Pin It on Pinterest

Password Reset
Please enter your e-mail address. You will receive a new password via e-mail.