The 3 New Shocking Revelations From Hillary Clinton’s Emails

Hacked audio of a private conversation between Hillary Clinton and her big donors at a private fundraiser has revealed how the candidate really feels about Bernie Sanders supporters.

The conversation took place at a McLean, Virginia fundraiser hosted by Beatrice Welters in February. It was obtained this week by the Washington Free Beacon and transcribed by the Intercept.

In her remarks, Clinton discusses how she would be likely to scrap an upgrade of the Long Range Stand-Off (LRSO) missile program, distanced herself from free college and free healthcare, and essentially called Sanders supporters basement dwellers. The woman who often claims to be progressive also described herself as “center-left to the center-right.”

“It is important to recognize what’s going on in this election. Everybody who’s ever been in an election that I’m aware of is quite bewildered because there is a strain of, on the one hand, the kind of populist, nationalist, xenophobic, discriminatory kind of approach that we hear too much of from the Republican candidates. And on the other side, there’s just a deep desire to believe that we can have free college, free healthcare, that what we’ve done hasn’t gone far enough, and that we just need to, you know,  go as far as, you know, Scandinavia, whatever that means, and half the people don’t know what that means, but it’s something that they deeply feel,” Clinton said, speaking of Sanders proposals. “So as a friend of mine said the other day, I am occupying from the center-left to the center-right. And I don’t have much company there. Because it is difficult when you’re running to be president, and you understand how hard the job is —  I don’t want to overpromise. I don’t want to tell people things that I know we cannot do.”

The former Secretary of State then really laid into why she believes so many younger voters preferred her opponent.

“Some are new to politics completely. They’re children of the Great Recession. And they are living in their parents’ basement,” Clinton said. “They feel they got their education and the jobs that are available to them are not at all what they envisioned for themselves. And they don’t see much of a future. I met with a group of young black millennials today and you know one of the young women said, ‘You know, none of us feel that we have the job that we should have gotten out of college. And we don’t believe the job market is going to give us much of a chance.’ So that is a mindset that is really affecting their politics. And so if you’re feeling like you’re consigned to, you know, being a barista, or you know, some other job that doesn’t pay a lot, and doesn’t have some other ladder of opportunity attached to it, then the idea that maybe, just maybe, you could be part of a political revolution is pretty appealing.”

Clinton then acknowledged that maybe, just maybe, it isn’t smart to be a “wet blanket” on young voters’ idealism — instead they should dupe the naive youngins into thinking what she can accomplish is bigger than it really is.

“So I think we should all be really understanding of that and should try to do the best we can not to be, you know, a wet blanket on idealism. We want people to be idealistic. We want them to set big goals. But to take what we can achieve now and try to present them as bigger goals.”

Yet, her campaign and supporters wonder why she is viewed as dismissive, condescending, and patronizing. Go figure.