Author: CarolineC

ISPs Removing Their Customers’ Email Encryption

Via EFF.org Nov. 11, 2014 Recently, Verizon was caught tampering with its customer’s web requests to inject a tracking super-cookie. Another network-tampering threat to user safety has come to light from other providers: email encryption downgrade attacks. In recent months, researchers have reported ISPs in the US and Thailand intercepting their customers’ data to strip a security flag—called STARTTLS—from email traffic. The STARTTLS flag is an essential security and privacy protection used by an email server to request encryption when talking to another server or client.1 By stripping out this flag, these ISPs prevent the email servers from successfully...

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Willie Nelson on the Wealth of the Land and the Power of the People

By Willie Nelson via Huffington Post Last month at Farm Aid 2014, I was lucky to meet Phillip Barker, a Black farmer who, like many minority farmers, lost much of his farmland as a result of discriminatory lending practices by banks and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Today, Phillip and his wife Dorathy farm the 20 acres they were able to hold on to in Oxford, North Carolina. Their farm is one of two Black dairy farming operations in the state of North Carolina. They also operate a nonprofit organization, Operation Spring Plant, which provides resources and training to...

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Really. The Rockefellers did fund Eugenics in America.

Via NYTimes.com Excerpt: When the Eugenics Record Office opened its doors in 1910, the founding scientists were considered progressives, intent on applying classic genetics to breeding better citizens. Funding poured in from the Rockefeller family and the Carnegie Institution. Charles Davenport, a prolific Harvard biologist, and his colleague, Harry H. Laughlin, led the charge. “There were many prominent New Yorkers involved in eugenics,” Dr. Tchen said. “It was initially about how to become more efficient as a modern society.” Researchers sought out “unfit” families in the Manhattan slums and the Pine Barrens of New Jersey. They cataloged disabilities and...

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Beleaguered Chase CEO Jamie Dimon Needs Help

Via Huffington Post JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon offered a grave warning on Friday about future cyberattacks. Making his first public statement about the enormous data breach that roiled the bank this summer, Dimon said the company would spend $250 million a year to increase security and prevent future breaches, The New York Times reported. “This is going to be a big deal and there will be a lot of battles,” he said, according to a JPMorgan spokeswoman. “We need a lot of help.” The comments, which were also Dimon’s first public remarks since he disclosed last summer that...

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Thousands attend independence rally in Scotland

Via ITV.com Thousands of people have attended a rally in the centre of Glasgow in support of Scottish independence. The five-hour ‘Hope Over Fear’ event in George Square was aimed at maintaining the momentum of the Yes movement, following its defeat in the referendum just over three weeks ago. Former socialist MSP Tommy Sheridan, who is now the co-convenor of Solidarity Scotland, rallied the crowd and called for similar events to be held in Edinburgh, Dundee, Fife and across...

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US appeals court OKs evidence from warrantless GPS device; case tests limit of police tracking

Via Star Tribune PHILADELPHIA — A U.S. appeals court on Wednesday ruled that prosecutors can use evidence gathered after a GPS device was put on a suspect’s van without a warrant. The decision is a blow to three Philadelphia brothers charged in a series of pharmacy robberies, and for civil rights lawyers concerned about the reach of police power in the technological age. “It’s disappointing that today’s decision lets law enforcement agents off the hook in a broader range of circumstances,” said Catherine Crump, a law professor at the University of California, Berkeley who argued the case in May...

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Ferguson demands high fees to turn over city files

Via Seattle Times Officials in Ferguson, Missouri, are charging nearly 10 times the cost of some of their own employees’ salaries before they will agree to turn over files under public records laws about the fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown. Missouri’s attorney general on Monday, after the AP first disclosed the practice, contacted Ferguson’s city attorney to ask for more information regarding fees related to document requests, the attorney general’s spokeswoman said. The move to charge high fees discourages journalists and civil rights groups from investigating the shooting and its aftermath. And it follows dozens of records requests...

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NYFF 2014: Edward Snowden documentary ‘Citizenfour’ jolts film world

Via LaTimes.com Many documentaries seek to kick-start environmental movements, reverse death row sentences or even change legislative policy. But few come with the kind of ideological ambition of the Edward Snowden study “Citizenfour,” a movie of grand scope that also tells an intimate personal story. The long-awaited documentary from Snowden chronicler Laura Poitras arrived with a bang at its world premiere at the New York Film Festival on Friday night, receiving a rare festival standing ovation ahead of its theatrical release Oct. 24, when it could well jolt both the fall moviegoing season and the national conversation about privacy...

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Nobel Prize winner Malala told Obama U.S. drone attacks fuel terrorism

Via http://www.mcclatchydc.com WASHINGTON — The teenager who became the youngest person to win the Nobel Peace Prize Friday told President Barack Obama at a White House meeting last year that she worried about the effect of U.S. drone strikes. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Malala Yousafzai of Pakistan, as well as Kailash Satyarthi of India, for pushing for young people’s rights, including the right to education. Malala, now 17, made international headlines after being shot in the head by the Taliban on a school bus two years ago for promoting education for girls in Pakistan. After recovering,...

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Civil Asset Forfeiture: They fought the law. Who won?

Via: Washington Post, September 8, 2014 Mandrel Stuart and his girlfriend were on a date driving on Interstate 66 toward the District when a Fairfax County police cruiser pulled out of the median and raced after them. The cruiser kept pace alongside Stuart’s old blue Yukon for a while, then followed behind for several miles before turning on its flashing lights. The traffic stop on that balmy afternoon in August 2012 was the beginning of a dizzying encounter that would leave Stuart shaken and wondering whether he had been singled out because he was black and had a police...

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